Tuesday, June 19, 2018
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The transparency of football clubs continues to raise doubts


Although football clubs have shown an improvement in their level of transparency compared to the previous edition of the INFUT, they are still far from the level of transparency required for these sports organisations. The four clubs that get the highest scores are clubs with small or medium budgets, which shows that transparency is a matter of will rather than size.


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The results of the Transparency Index of Football Clubs (INFUT) 2016, prepared by the organization Transparencia Internacional España, have just been published to measure the level of transparency, through a set of sixty indicators, of the forty-one clubs/SAD that make up the first and second division (Liga Santander and Liga 1,2,3)


The final average score of all the clubs was 62.8 out of 100, higher than the average score obtained in the previous edition of INFUT: 44.2. In this edition, the average score of the 20 clubs/SAD of the first division was 71.8, compared to 49.7 in the previous edition. Meanwhile, the second-division club average score was 54.4, even higher than the 39.0 score achieved in the previous edition of the INFUT.


The clubs/SAD that have obtained the highest score were Betis and Numancia, who obtained the highest possible rating (100 out of 100), Eibar and Lugo were also prominent. It happens that Betis was in the last position of the 41 clubs evaluated in the previous edition of the INFUT.


At the global valuation level, there are 29 clubs (71%) that surpassed 50 points out of 100, leaving the remaining 12 clubs (29%) below the approved mark. Among the former, apart from the two clubs with the highest score, there are five other clubs that obtained an outstanding rating (more than 90); on the other hand, 10 other clubs achieved a significant score (more than 70 out of 100), while 12 clubs got at least the passing score (between 50 and 69); finally there are twelve clubs that obtained a failing score. On the other hand, the level of dispersion between the final scores was very high, since between the first two and the last club of the ranking there is a difference of 84 percentage points.



At the global valuation level, there are 29 clubs (71%) that surpassed 50 points out of 100, leaving the remaining 12 clubs (29%) below the approved mark



Transparency is a matter of will


One of the conclusions of the study is that transparency is a matter of will or attitude, rather than of economic size or budgetary capacity, since the four winning clubs have a relatively small economic dimension, and in the sports rating, rank in both first and second divisions. This shows the causal relationship between the will for transparency and the results obtained in the INFUT, more than the clubs' economic size or sports capacity.


Another feature highlighted in this second edition of INFUT was the marked level of improvement seen on average by soccer clubs during the evaluation period, that is, from the moment they were sent the provisional evaluation pre-filled by TI-Spain, until the date in which soccer clubs were able to finally send the completed questionnaires to this organization, once the corresponding indicators with respect to the previous evaluation were added. Specifically, the average initial score of these entities was 34.7 (out of 100), while the final score was 62.8, a final average score which in any case is clearly insufficient, and therefore clearly improvable with regard to the future.


With regard to the five areas of transparency evaluated, in three of them the average score exceeded 50 points out of 100; specifically in area A) Information about the Football Club, the average score was 75.6; In B) Relations with members, amateurs and the general public, reaches 74.1, and in the area E) Indicators of the Transparency Law, obtained an average score of 64.3. On the contrary, the areas in which they failed on average were: C) Economic-financial transparency, where they obtained 49.6, and in D) Transparency in contracting and supplies, in which they obtained an average score of 40.7 out of 100.



One of the conclusions of the study is that transparency is a matter of will or attitude, rather than of economic size or budgetary capacity



It is important to remember that in this Index, as for other indexes of transparency prepared by TI-Spain, we assess whether or not the information required is available to the public, rather than assessing the quality of the information, nor the quality of the management of soccer/SAD clubs.


Finally, we should note that the INFUT is an index with a positive purpose, by which TI-Spain intends to be able to promote a progressive improvement of the transparency and opening up of information of all the football clubs/sports corporations that make up the two main Spanish football divisions.


Reports prepared by Transparency International


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THE ECONOMY JOURNAL

Ronda Universitat 12, 7ª Planta -08007 Barcelona
Tlf (34) 93 301 05 12
Inscrita en el Registro Mercantil de Barcelona al tomo 39.480,
folio 12, hoja B347324, Inscripcion 1

THE ECONOMY JOURNAL ALL RIGHTS RESERVED